Posts for: March, 2014

WhatDentalDeviceDoesTVHostVannaWhiteKeeponherNightstand

Here's an interesting tidbit of information on Wheel of Fortune host Vanna White: like many people, she grinds her teeth at night. In a detailed interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Vanna explained how she had to replace a filling in a back tooth several times because of her grinding habit. Eventually, she had her dentist make her a nightguard to protect her famous smile.

“I really try to sleep with it every night,” Vanna told the magazine. “I try to keep it on my nightstand so when I go to bed, I remember to put it in. Or I will put it by my toothbrush so I can put it in after brushing my teeth at night.”

The habit of teeth grinding or clenching is often associated with stress and/or sleep deprivation. It is referred to as “parafunctional” (“para” – outside, “function” – normal), meaning it can generate biting forces well outside the normal range — perhaps 10 times normal. This excessive force can affect many areas of the oral system. Teeth may become worn, chipped or loose; jaw joints or muscles can go into spasm; and some grinders (or “bruxers” as they are also called) may even experience discomfort of the head, ears, neck or back. Many times, a person with a grinding habit does not become aware of it until it is pointed out by a sleep partner or dental professional.

Like Vanna White's dentist, we often recommend a nightguard to those with nocturnal bruxing habits. It is made of a very thin, wear-resistant plastic that fits over the biting surfaces of the upper teeth only. The lower teeth are then free to glide or skate over the guard, which prevents them from biting into the upper teeth. Some people wear their guards during the day if they tend to clench their teeth when under stress.

If you are concerned about teeth grinding or interested in learning more about nightguards, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Vanna White, please see “Vanna White.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Stress & Tooth Habits.”


By James C. Palmer, DDS
March 03, 2014
Category: Oral Health
ReducingtheRisksandEffectsofDentalSportsInjuries

Sports are an important element in human society — besides providing enjoyment they also build discipline, teamwork and character.

But sports activities, especially for children and teenagers, also carry the risk of physical injury — and your teeth and mouth aren’t immune. About 22,000 mouth injuries occur annually in individuals under the age of 18. As the degree of contact within the sport rises, so does the risk of dental injuries.

To reduce this risk, it’s important to adopt a comprehensive approach to dental injuries, beginning with protection. For any sport that involves a ball, stick, puck or physical contact with another player, athletes should incorporate two pieces of equipment to fully protect against mouth injury: headgear and a mouthguard. Both help to evenly distribute the forces generated during an impact and thus reduce the chance or severity of injury.

The design of headgear will depend on other factors involving a particular sport. Mouthguards are more singular in their purpose, and so what works in one sport should work in another. While there are a number of types like stock or “boil and bite,” the highest level of protection is a custom-fitted mouthguard created by a dentist to specifically fit the individual’s bite. Although more costly than other options, it can better reduce the chances of an even more costly mouth injury.

Because we can only reduce the risk of injury but never eliminate it, protection is only part of the approach. Individuals, parents and sports officials should have plans in place for treating dental injuries should they occur. Depending on the level of trauma, individuals should have access to a dentist as soon as possible. It’s also important to know what to do when specific injuries occur, whether they require an immediate, urgent or less urgent response. The Dear Doctor magazine article, “The Field Guide to Dental Injuries” is an excellent primer on dental injury treatment.

Sports can have a positive effect on physical, emotional and social development. Adopting a well-rounded approach to dental injury prevention and treatment will help keep the focus on those benefits.

If you would like more information on protection and treatment from sports-related dental injuries, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”




Contact Us

James C. Palmer, DDS

(318) 927-6152
729 West Main Street Homer, LA 71040